Pharmacoethics: A Problem-Based Approach (Pharmacy Education Series)

Book Reviews: About 20 years ago, the University of New Mexico School of Medicine (SOM) established a student-centered problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum emphasizing ambulatory care practice competencies. It was designed for small groups of students working together and ran parallel with their more traditional curriculum. The SOM faculty pioneered difficult changes that also paved the way for changes at the SOM’s affiliated College of Pharmacy (COP). Subsequently, other COPs (e.g., at Samford University) have faced the difficult challenge of conversion of their curriculum. Those teachers who have undertaken to embrace this new type of learning usually have done so on the basis of a personal educational philosophy that was in line with student-centered problem-based learning. To many pharmacy professors, their students may have seemed bored and dissatisfied with their professional education and viewed the process as difficult and with irrelevant “hurdles” that have to be overcome to become a registered pharmacist. Students may have had too much emphasis on memorization and seemed to forget readily what was taught them.

The method you are asked to use for learning has a strong influence on how well you will be able to recall and apply what you have learned in the “real world” outside your COP. Problem-based learning can better help you become an independent thinker. It can help you reason through your patient’s problems and recall and apply what you have been taught in your COP to care for your patients. Finally, it can help you learn new information, as you need it, and keep your knowledge and skills contemporary.

About the same time that the University of New Mexico Health Science Center was developing its student-centered problem-based learning curricula, it also developed, under the care of Dr. Miriam McIver Gibson, a set of seven clinical ethics competencies for its School of Medicine, College of Nursing, and College of Pharmacy students: (1) professional responsibility, (2) patients’ rights, (3) privacy and confidentiality, (4) truth telling, (5) reproductive ethics, (6) distributive justice, and (7) research ethics. In addition to this list of clinical ethics competencies, another list was developed specifically pertaining to research ethics competencies: (1) history; (2) principles, standards, and regulations; (3) integrity in science; (4) research on human subjects; (5) research/ testing on animals; and (6) contemporary issues. Unfortunately, the student-centered problem-based learning cases at the University of New Mexico COP have excluded discussion of these important clinical ethics competencies and research ethics competencies and have instead focused on those competencies specific to the tenets of clinical and basic science.

More recently at the University of New Mexico, there has been the development of the innovative Center for Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, and Addictions (CASAA). It is here that pioneers like Dr. William R. Miller and Dr. Theresa B.Moyers have been able to effectively utilize motivational interviewing in tandem with the trans theoretical model to help vulnerable individuals with destructive behaviors overcome ambivalence and attain more positive outcomes. Again, regrettably, the student-centered problem-based learning cases at the University of New Mexico COP have excluded discussion of these innovative intervention techniques (in addition to the important clinical ethics competencies and research ethics competencies discussed above) and have instead continued to focus on competencies specific to the tenets of clinical and basic science.

All three of these important developments (in student-centered problem-based learning, in clinical ethics competencies and research ethics competencies, and in behavior change using motivational interviewing) at the University of New Mexico have converged here with the development of this innovative book. This book should in no way be construed as an innovation of the authors, but rather as the confluence of the original developments of those professors mentioned above.

Therefore, in summary, the purpose of this book is to have you more effectively focus and learn important clinical ethics competencies and research ethics competencies using student-centered problem-based learning. And, unlike most textbooks on ethics that concentrate on ethical principles and ethical decision making, this textbook goes one step further and tries to help you learn how to utilize motivational interviewing techniques effectively with the people involved to help everyone work through difficult ethical situations to attain more positive clinical, behavioral, and social outcomes.

Bibliographical Data of Pharmacoethics: A Problem-Based Approach (Pharmacy Education Series)

Reference Type: Book
Record Number: xx
Author: David A. Gettman, Dean Arneson
Year: 2003
Place Published: Boca Raton, Florida
Publisher: CRC Press
Number of Pages: 472
Edition: 1st
ISBN -10: 1587160358
ISBN-13: 978-1587160356
Kindle Available: ASIN- B004EVMWWK
Buy: Get it on Amazon

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